Richard Harland (UC Berkeley) 2: The Cellular Basis of Gastrulation

Richard Harland (UC Berkeley) 2: The Cellular Basis of Gastrulation

Recording date: 18/04/2018
Viewed: 1 time

Xenopus laevis, is an excellent model to study vertebrate development. Richard Harland outlines frog development including the cell movements and molecular signals of gastrulation. https://www.ibiology.org/development-and-stem-cells/frog-development/ Talk Overview: Richard Harland begins his talk by asking how a fertilized egg goes from a single cell to a complex, multicellular organism during vertebrate development.  He explains that amphibians, and in particular Xenopus laevis, are an excellent system for addressing this question.  For example, early experiments by Spemann and Mangel in newt embryos were the first to demonstrate the presence of an “organizer” region, and more recent studies in Xenopus have identified many signaling molecules that control embryogenesis. Throughout his talk, Harland shows stunning movies to illustrate the beauty and complexity of early frog development. During the gastrulation, cell movements result in a massive reorganization of the embryo from a simple spherical ball of cells, the blastula, into a multi-layered organism. In his second video, Harland simplifies this complex phase of frog development by breaking it down into 7 separate steps and describing the specific cell rearrangements associated with each step. In his last talk, Harland introduces the signaling molecules responsible for specifying distinct tissues in the embryo.  He explains how gradients of signaling molecules, such as β-catenin and Nodal, are initially set up in the egg and how these gradients induce the formation of the mesoderm layer. He also describes classic experiments from the 1990s showing that the organizer is necessary to pattern the mesoderm into tissues such as muscle and neural plate. Harland then focuses on experiments from his lab that identified the molecules expressed in the organizer that specify dorsal cell fate.   Speaker Biography: Richard Harland is the C. H. Li Distinguished Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University of California, Berkeley where his lab studies early vertebrate development in both Xenopus and in mice. As a PhD student, Harland studied DNA replication in the lab of Dr. Ron Laskey at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge. He moved to the USA, and began his studies of vertebrate development, as a post-doc with Harold Weintraub at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. In 1985, Harland joined the faculty at UC Berkeley. As well as running a successful research lab, Harland is an integral member of the developmental biology community.  He has played an important role in the project to sequence the Xenopus tropicalis and X. laevis genomes. He has taught in the Marine Biological Lab Embryology course for over 15 years and he co-authored the textbook “Early Development of Xenopus laevis: A Laboratory Manual”.  His contributions to science and teaching have been recognized with the award of the E.G. Conklin Medal from the Society for Developmental Biology and election to the National Academy of Sciences. Learn more about Harland’s lab here: https://mcb.berkeley.edu/labs/harland

Richard Harland (University of California, Berkeley)


to add comments