Elaine Fuchs (Rockefeller, HHMI) 2: Tapping the Potential of Adult Skin Stem Cells

Elaine Fuchs (Rockefeller, HHMI) 2: Tapping the Potential of Adult Skin Stem Cells

Recording date: 11/07/2018
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Skin stem cells have great potential for the treatment of burns and corneal injuries. As Elaine Fuchs explains, understanding skin stem cell biology is also key to understanding cancers such as squamous cell carcinoma. https://www.ibiology.org/development-and-stem-cells/skin-stem-cells Talk Overview: Part 2 of 3: In her second talk, Fuchs focuses primarily on studies of adult skin stem cells. Adult stem cells have the ability to make more stem cells and to generate the cells of a differentiated tissue. Skin stem cells can replenish the epidermis and make hair follicle cells. Skin grown in culture from just a few skin stem cells can be used to treat burn patients or replace damaged corneal epithelium. Stem cells reside in specific niches or microenvironments and signals from the niche determine whether a stem cell is going to be quiescent or make tissue. Fuchs’ lab has studied hair follicle stem cells for many years and has identified the signals that activate hair follicle stem cells as well as the specific set of transcription factors that are upregulated in the activated stem cells. They have shown that many of the genes turned on during stem cell activation are regulated by super enhancers which sense the niche environment. Speaker Biography: Elaine Fuchs is the Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development at The Rockefeller University and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Her lab studies the role of skin stem cells in homeostasis and wound repair and how these processes go awry in cancer and inflammatory diseases. Fuchs received her BS in chemistry from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana and her PhD in biochemistry from Princeton. She developed her interest in skin biology as a post-doctoral fellow with Howard Green at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Before joining Rockefeller University in 2002, Fuchs was a faculty member at the University of Chicago for twenty years. Fuchs’ many contributions to skin and stem cell biology have been recognized with myriad awards and honors including the National Medal of Science in 2008, the March of Dimes Prize in 2012, and the E.B. Wilson Prize from the American Society of Cell Biology in 2015, to name a few. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine. Learn more about Dr. Fuchs’ research here: https://www.rockefeller.edu/our-scientists/heads-of-laboratories/1166-elaine-fuchs/ http://www.hhmi.org/scientists/elaine-fuchs

Elaine Fuchs (Rockefeller University & Howard Hughes Medical Institute)


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