Newt Sex: Buff Males! Writhing Females! Cannibalism! | Deep Look

Newt Sex: Buff Males! Writhing Females! Cannibalism! | Deep Look

Recording date: 17/06/2015
Viewed: 0 time

Every winter, California newts leave the safety of their forest burrows and travel as far as three miles to mate in the pond where they were born. Their mating ritual is a raucous affair that involves bulked-up males, writhing females and a little cannibalism. SUBSCRIBE: http://goo.gl/8NwXqt These amphibious creatures are about five to eight inches long, with rust-colored skin, except for their bright yellow eyes and belly. They began to arrive at the UC Botanical Garden around November, and will stay here for the duration of the rainy season, usually through the end of March. While California newts (Taricha torosa) are only about six inches long, they might travel as far as three miles to return to their birthplace. That's the equivalent for a human of walking about a marathon and a half, without any signs or road maps. Scientists aren't sure exactly how they find their way, but they think it might be based on smell. Why do newts live in a pond? California Newts live most of their time in the forest, but mate in the pond where they were born.

KQED


to add comments