Jeannie Lee (Harvard) 1 - X Chromosome Inactivation: Making and Breaking the Silence

Jeannie Lee (Harvard) 1 - X Chromosome Inactivation: Making and Breaking the Silence

Recording date: 08/05/2019
Viewed: 1 time

https://www.ibiology.org/development-and-stem-cells/x-chromosome-inactivation The X chromosome is many time larger than the Y chromosome. To compensate for this genetic inequality, female mammalian cells undergo X chromosome inactivation of one X chromosome. Dr. Jeannie Lee explains the how and why of X chromosome inactivation. Part 1 of 3: In mammals, sex is determined by a pair of unequal sex chromosomes. Genetically male mammals have an X and a Y chromosome while genetically female mammals have two X chromosomes. The X chromosome is many times larger than the Y chromosome. To compensate for this genetic inequality, female mammals undergo X chromosome inactivation in which one of the X chromosomes is randomly chosen to be silenced. X chromosome inactivation has been studied for over 50 years both because it is a physiologically important event and because it is an excellent model for studying epigenetic silencing of genes by long non-coding RNAs. In her first talk, Dr. Jeannie Lee gives an overview of the steps a cell must go through during X inactivation. These include “counting” the X chromosomes, deciding which X chromosome to inactivate, initiating the inactivation and spreading it across the chromosome, and finally maintaining inactivation of the same X chromosome for the rest of the life of the organism. Speaker Biography: Dr. Jeannie Lee is a Professor in the Department of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and in the Department of Molecular Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Her lab uses X chromosome inactivation as a model to study epigenetic regulation by long noncoding RNAs. Lee received her AB in biochemistry and molecular biology from Harvard University and her MD/PhD from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She was a postdoctoral fellow at the Whitehead Institute and a resident at MGH before joining Harvard/MGH as a faculty member in 1997. Lee was also an HHMI Investigator from 2001-2018. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Lee has been honored with numerous awards including the 2016 Centennial Prize from the Genetics Society of America, the 2016 Lurie Prize from the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, and the 2010 Molecular Biology Award from the National Academy of Sciences. In 2018, she was President of the Genetics Society of America. Learn more about Dr. Lee’s research here: https://www.x-inactivation-lee-lab.org

Jeannie Lee (Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital)


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